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Bayard Rustin | Organized the Freedom Rides | Pride T-Shirt

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Bayard Rustin | Organized the Freedom Rides  (March 17, 1912 – August 24, 1987) was an African American leader in social movements for civil rights, socialism, nonviolence, and gay rights.

 Our Spartan Pride T-Shirts & Jersey Tanks
 
We're soldiers, scientists, politicians, business owners, artists & entertainers. We're fighters with a rich history of significant contributions to all our cultures. Our pride shirts display this, each with a name and the contributions of the individual, there is a direct link to their biography. There is no shame in being LGBTQIA+ just an enormous celebration that you are authentic and fearless. "You've always been in good company."

 

The unisex heavy cotton tee is the basic staple of any wardrobe. It is the foundation upon which casual fashion grows. The specialty spun fibers provide a smooth surface for premium printing vividity and sharpness. No side seams mean there are no itchy interruptions under the arms. The shoulders have tape for improved durability.

.: 100% cotton (fiber content may vary for different colors)
.: Medium fabric (5.3 oz/yd² (180 g/m²))
.: Classic fit
.: Tear-away label
.: Runs true to size

 
Bayard Rustin | Organized the Freedom Rides  (March 17, 1912 – August 24, 1987) was an African American leader in social movements for civil rights, socialism, nonviolence, and gay rights.
 
Rustin worked with A. Philip Randolph on the March on Washington Movement, in 1941, to press for an end to racial discrimination in employment. Rustin later organized Freedom Rides and helped to organize the Southern Christian Leadership Conference to strengthen Martin Luther King Jr.'s leadership and teaching King about nonviolence; he later served as an organizer for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Rustin worked alongside Ella Baker, a co-director of the Crusade for Citizenship, in 1954; and before the Montgomery bus boycott, he helped organize a group, called "In Friendship", amongst Baker, Stanley Levison of the American Jewish Congress, and some other labor leaders. "In Friendship" provided material and legal assistance to those being evicted from their tenant farms and households in Clarendon County, Yazoo, and other places. Rustin became the head of the AFL–CIO's A. Philip Randolph Institute, which promoted the integration of formerly all-white unions and promoted the unionization of African Americans. During the 1970s and 1980s, Rustin served on many humanitarian missions, such as aiding refugees from Vietnam and Cambodia. At the time of his death in 1987, he was on a humanitarian mission in Haiti.
 
Rustin was a gay man and, due to criticism over his sexuality, he usually acted as an influential adviser behind the scenes to civil-rights leaders. In the 1980s, he became a public advocate on behalf of gay causes, speaking at events as an activist and supporter of human rights.
 
Later in life, while still devoted to securing workers' rights, Rustin joined other union leaders in aligning with ideological neoconservatism, and (after his death) President Ronald Reagan praised him. On November 20, 2013, President Barack Obama posthumously awarded Rustin the Presidential Medal of Freedom.